Randomized Control Trial (RCT) shows our app GGRO is usefull in reducing ROCD symptoms

See this paper for further details. Roncero M, Belloch A, Doron G (in press). Can brief, daily training using a mobile applications help change maladaptive beliefs? A cross-over randomized-control study evaluating the efficacy of GGRO in reducing maladaptive beliefs and obsessive-compulsive symptoms. JMIR mHealth and uHealth. DOI: 10.2196/11443

New App for depressive symptoms

ROCD symptoms are often associated with depressive symptoms. We, therefore, now created an app to challenge beliefs underlying depressive symptoms including feelings of hopelessness and helplessness, being active, loneliness,  self-blame and more.   See links below

GGDE: Beat & Prevent Depression

GGDE iPhone

GGDE Android

 

A new paper published on ROCD!

The paper is entitled:” Maladaptive beliefs in relationship obsessive compulsive disorder (ROCD): Replication and extension in a clinical sample”. Press here to see the paper.

A paper published using our GGRO mobile application for ROCD

The paper is entitled: A novel approach to challenging OCD related beliefs using a mobile-app: An exploratory study .

To see a pre-printed version of the paper see this link

A new paper added to ROCD.net: “I can’t stop thinking about my child’s flaws”: An investigation of parental preoccupation with their children’s perceived flaws

See this link: “I can’t stop thinking about my child’s flaws”: An investigation of parental preoccupation with their children’s perceived flaws

GGBI: A new mobile app for dealing with body image distress and preoccupation such as in Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD)

ROCD and other OCD symptoms are frequently related to body image distress and preoccupations such as found in BDD. A new mobile app dealing with such problems, named GGBI is now out in the apple store and Google Play: these are the links

On android:

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=air.com.samuramu.gg.bi

 

On iPhone

https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/ggbi-body-image-distress-preoccupation/id1240093612?mt=8

This September! A workshop on the assessment and treatment of ROCD at the EABCT 2017 conference

Associate Professor Guy Doron and Dr Danny Derby are giving a workshop on the 15.09.2017 entitled: ” Relationship Interrupted: Assessment and Treatment of Relationship Obsessive Compulsive Disorder(ROCD)” at the next EABCT meeting in Ljubljana – Slovenia. To register see http://www.eabct2017.org/en/REGISTRATION.html/

Very positive GGRO satisfaction ratings

In a new survey regarding user satisfaction of GGRO (n=75) 95.6% of participating users responded “strongly agree” or “agree” to the statement “I like using GGRO”. In addition,  83.1% of users responded “strongly agree” or “agree” with the statement “GGRO is a useful training App for dealing with relationships doubts and preoccupations” and 68.9% of users marked “strongly agree” or “agree” with the statement “GGRO helped me with my relationship fears and anxieties”.

New study gives further support to GGRO effectiveness

Throw away and pull towards: A new way to challenge OCD related cognitions using the GGRO mobile application training platform.

Authors: M. Roncero, B. Pascual, S. Arnáez, M. Giraldo-O’Meara, G. García-Soriano, A. Belloch, and G. Doron.

According to cognitive models of OCD, obsessive compulsive symptoms result from catastrophic misinterpretations of commonly occurring intrusive thoughts, images and urges and the use of counterproductive strategies used to manage them. Maladaptive beliefs such as inflated responsibility/threat, importance and control of thoughts, perfectionism and intolerance for uncertainty increase the likelihood of such negative interpretations of intrusive experience. Indeed, traditional cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) includes a variety of intervention to challenge maladaptive beliefs including behavioral experiments and cognitive reconstruction. Consistent with a growing body of literature supporting the usefulness of mobile based technologies in fostering cognitive behavior change, the present study assessed the effectiveness of a novel cognitive training exercise designed to challenge OCD related cognitive beliefs. This mobile technology (application) based training exercise consists of users having to pull statements challenging OCD-related beliefs towards themselves (downwards) and to throw away (push upwards) contra-productive self-statements Method: 36 third year BA students started the trial. Twenty completed both pre and post measures of OCD symptoms (OCI-R; Foa et al., 2002), ROCD (ROCI & PROCSI; Doron et al., 2012a, 2012b), OCD related beliefs (OBQ; Moulding et al., 2011) and mood (Antony et al., 1998). Participants were instructed to complete two minutes of daily training (3 training levels) for a period of 15 days. Results: No significant differences were found between completers and no-completers on demographic and symptom related measures at Time 1. Repeated-measures ANOVA of the 20 completers showed a significant reductions on all OCD symptoms measures and on OCD-beliefs. No significant reduction was found in depression symptoms. Discussion: This innovative mobile technology based training exercise may be useful in reducing OCD-related beliefs levels and associated symptoms. The use of this and similar mobile training platforms holds promise for low intensity psychological treatments recommended by NICE (2005), and may be effective as prevention tool for those people at risk of suffering OCD. Limitation: This is an open trial with relatively small student sample.