The GG Life app: Coronavirus mental health first aid

Relationship OCD (ROCD) is often associated with difficulty dealing with uncertainty. The current Coronavirus pandemic and the associated ramifications often increase uncertainty. This is why we’ve decided to use our research based mobile platform to help all that are dealing with stress and worries related to the current situation. Our new app GG Life now includes a FREE module specifically addressing these issues.

Thinkable: Anxiety relief
Thinkable: Anxiety relief
Developer: Ggtude Ltd
Price: Free+
‎Thinkable: Anxiety relief
‎Thinkable: Anxiety relief
Developer: Ggtude Ltd
Price: Free+


A pilot study conducted on GGRO showed encouraging results!

We thank all those participating in our pilot study of GGRO! below are the results of the study. 

Background: Previous research has linked relationship-related anxieties, doubts and preoccupations (i.e., relationship obsessive compulsive disorder symptoms; ROCD) with reduced functioning, decreased relational and sexual functioning and lower mood. As knowledge of ROCD is emerging, individuals with such symptoms may be frequently misdiagnosed leading to reduced accessibility to adequate treatment.  A growing body of literature has supported the usefulness of mobile technology in increasing accessibility to mental health knowledge and in fostering mental health or behavior change. In the present study, we examined associations between relationship related anxieties, doubts and preoccupations (i.e., ROCD symptoms) and the pattern of  use of a mobile application named GGRO. This mobile application was designed to challenge maladaptive beliefs related to relationship difficulties. GGRO encourages two minutes of daily training (3 levels a day) over a period of at least 15 days.

Method. Fifty-one users of GGRO responded to a short survey pertaining to application use, satisfaction and relationship-related anxieties and preoccupations.

Results. The number of sessions ranged from 1 to 100 with forty-five participants reporting using GGRO five times or more. Medium-size statistically significant correlations were found between reported number of sessions of GGRO users (i.e., in participants that used GGRO more than 5 times) and relationship-related anxieties and preoccupations (Spearman’s rho r=-.35) suggesting greater number of sessions was related to less such relationship difficulties reported. Similarly, the higher the level participants reported reaching on GGRO (maximum being 45), the less relationship-related anxieties and preoccupations they described (Spearman’s rho r=-.30). Finally, as expected, satisfaction from GGRO was also related to less reported relationship anxieties and preoccupations (Spearman’s rho r=-.45).

Conclusions. Daily use of mobile technology aimed at challenging underlying relationship-related maladaptive beliefs may be associated with reduced relationship-related anxieties and preoccupations.